Wednesday, December 3, 2008

Chapter 6 Questions

1. What kind of risky activity do Scout, Jem and Dill engage in? Explain their cover-up (how do they avoid being caught?).

2. Who is blamed for trespassing on the Radley Place? What does this blame reveal about the setting (time and place) of the novel?

3. What causes fear in the hearts of Scout and Jem?

5 comments:

KCSS said...

1)jem scout and dill avoid being caught at the radley house by saying they were playing strip poker.

2)someone who was african american was blamed of being at the radley place. the time of this novel was when black people were hated by everyone.

3) the fear in jem and scouts hearts was that they saw the shadow in the radley house

Stew said...

3. Many events that occurred in the night that struck fear in the hearts of Jem and Scout include; Mr. Radley firing his shotgun at Jem thinking it was a Negro, and the threats he shouted at Jem as he ran from the Radley house. Scout and Jem were also worried that the 'dreadful' Boo Radley will come after them.

Rida said...

1. The risky activity that Scout, Jem, and Dill engage in is going to Boo Radley's place and peeking through his garden, front porch and window, after Atticus told them to "stop tormenting that man". Their cover up consisted of going through the schoolyard and then climbing over the fence to get back home..to avoid getting caught. Also, Dill covers up for the absence of Jem's pants by telling the adults that they were playing strip poker.

Jen said...

2. Negroes in the community are blamed for the tresspassing on the Radley's property. This blame reveals that this novel takes place before the rights of the Black Communtiy are officially approved and granted. The story also takes place in the south, one can tell this because it took longer for African-Americans to be accepted there. In conclusion it is also apparent that the small community of Maycomb, Alabama is mostly a racist and prejudice environment towards the Black Community.

Juan said...
This comment has been removed by the author.