Thursday, December 4, 2008

Chapter 12 Questions

1) Briefly explain Jem's and Scout's visit to First Purchase Church (Calpurnia's Church). What do people think/feel about them?

2) What new things do Scout and Jem learn at this Church about how Black people live?

3) Explain why Calpurnia speaks differently in the Finch household, and among her neighbours at Church. How is language different in a workplace and in a social setting and/or around family?

9 comments:

shamu said...

Black people there hate white people. So they dont know how to read and they have one person read the hyms to them. Also they ask for money for the robinsons.
CHP.12#1

KCSS said...

1. Overall people in the curch are very welcoming and glad that they came. Luba was an exception to this. She thought it was wrong that white children came into a coloured church.

2. Scout and Jem learned that most black people don't know how to read. This was th reason why they don't have hymn books in their church. They also learned that they didn't go to school and had to teach eachother how to read and write.

3. She speaks differently because " it would be out of place," and people would think different of her. She says it would be like Scout and Jem talking like coloured people at home, it would be odd.

Alannah said...

1. Calpurnia offered to take Jem and Scout to her church when Atticus was away. Calpurnia's church was outside of town and was for black people only. When they arrived the congregation were very respectful and welcoming except for one woman. This woman's attitude was the exception because the black community had such high regard for Atticus that they openly welcomed Jem and Scout to their church.

Karleigh said...

2. Some new things that scout and Jem learned were that in black churches they don't have hymn books. This was because most of the black community cannot read. Another thing that they learned was that the black children did not go to school and that they had to teach each other how to read and write but only if they wanted to receive an education.

Peter said...

3.) Calpurnia talks with less of her natural accent when she lives with the Finches, because she can exert her full grammatical capabilities without the pressure of seeming intellectually superior to the people around her. If she talked like a white person at the church, or a black person around the Finches, she would seem out of place. By having discretion as to what accent she uses when conversing with the people around her, she can hide evidence of her alternate lives.

Victoria Tchachnikova said...

2. Scout and Jem learned that black peoplr struggle with reading, and very few of them know how to. They do not have a proper education, so they talk slang. They learned that the black community is very supportive of one another, because they were collecting money for Tom Robinson's wife who could not get a job these days.

Victoria Tchachnikova said...

people*.

chinese is too cool said...

1) Calpurnia decides to bring Scout and Jem to her own church, the First Purchase church. One woman, Lula criticizes Calpurnia for bringing “white chillun to nigger church”, but aside from that, the congregation is generally friendly, and Reverend Sykes gives them a special welcome, saying that everyone knows their father.

2) The children come to terms with the extent of poverty the black community faces. They see this through the "paint-peeling" church and the lack of hymn books. To their surprise, they also learn that most blacks are illiterate. There is no school for the blacks and those that could read had been taught at home. Scout and Jem also witness for themselves the unity that binds the black community together. Although all of them face challenges of their own, they join together to help Helen Robinson who cannot find a job because of the charges against her husband. Adversity seems to bring the blacks together and despite all the odds stacked against them, the blacks are a happy community.

3) Calpurnia does not want to seem out of place or offend anyone by using "nigger-talk" with "white folk" and vice-versa. She knows that if she spoke properly among "black folk", they would think she was "puttin' on airs", and snubbing them, therefore she reverts to the negro slang in church. In the workplace, one has to adapt oneself to fit the image of the corporation, whereas at home it is more important to use comfortable speech and have everyone understand you. This way, people will not feel hesitant in approaching you.

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